Dermatitis:

 

Also known as eczema, is inflammation of the skin. It is characterized by itchy, erythematous, vesicular, weeping, and crusting patches.  The cause of dermatitis is unclear. One possibility is a dysfunctional interplay between the immune system and skin.

  • Irritants: soaps, detergents, shampoos, disinfectants, juices from fresh fruits, meats or vegetables
  • Allergens: dust mites, pets, pollens, mold, dandruff
  • Microbes: bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, viruses, certain fungi

Psoriasis begins in the immune system, mainly with a type of white blood cell called a T cell. T cells help protect the body against infection and disease. With psoriasis, T cells are put into action by mistake. They become so active that they set off other immune responses. This leads to swelling and fast turnover of skin cells. People with psoriasis may notice that sometimes the skin gets better and sometimes it gets worse. Things that can cause the skin to get worse include: infections, stress, changes in weather that dry the skin, certain medicines.

is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin. These skin patches are typically red, itchy, and scaly. They may vary in severity from small and localized to complete body coverage. Injury to the skin can trigger psoriatic skin changes at that spot, which is known as Koebner phenomenon.  (Wikipedia)

SCALP SKIN

DISEASE

​​The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions. These include dryness and recurring skin rashes that are characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin swelling, itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. Areas of temporary skin discoloration may appear and are sometimes due to healed injuries. Scratching open a healing lesion may result in scarring and may enlarge the rash. (Wikipedia)

Genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immune-system factors have been shown to be involved in the manifestation of seborrheic dermatitis.  Seborrheic dermatitis may be aggravated by illness, psychological stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, change of season and reduced general health.  In children, excessive vitamin A intake can cause seborrheic dermatitis.

Lack of biotin, pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and riboflavin (vitamin B2) may also be a cause.  The best way to prevent this is keep your scalp clean and dry with proper nutrition in your body.

  • Hot and cold temperatures: hot weather, high and low humidity, perspiration from exercise​
  • Foods: dairy products, eggs, nuts and seeds, soy products, wheat
  • Stress: it is not a cause of eczema but can make symptoms worse
  • Hormones: women can experience worsening of eczema symptoms at times when their hormone levels are changing, for example during pregnancy and at certain points in their menstrual cycle.

Seborrheic Dermatitis (also Dandruff):

 

Also known as seborrhea, sebopsoriasis, seborrheic eczema, dandruff and pityriasis capitis, is a chronic, relapsing and usually mild dermatitis. In infants seborrheic dermatitis is called cradle cap.  Seborrheic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disorder affecting the scalp, face, and torso. Typically, seborrheic dermatitis presents with scaly, flaky, itchy, and red skin.  It particularly affects the sebaceous-gland-rich areas of skin. In adolescents and adults, seborrheic dermatitis usually presents as scalp scaling similar to dandruff or as mild to marked erythema of the nasolabial fold.

Psoriasis :

​​​Environmental factors are also known to bring out the symptoms of eczema. 

These include: